FEATURED PRODUCTS

Client:

Blue Sky Hospitality

Credits:

Designer: Henry Chebaane

An eclectic mix of Scottish heritage, Victorian steampunk and period curiosities, complemented by the extensive use of our decorative tin tiles.

CREATIVE DECOR

Flora Indica is an Indian restaurant and cocktail bar located on the historic and splendid Old Brompton Road in Earl’s Court, London. Its quirky design pays tribute to the intrepid Scottish botanists who travelled throughout India during the Victorian period. As a result of their endeavours, a book which contains this epic catalogue of botanical species, entitled Flora Indica, was published in London in 1855.

The creative décor, by Henry Chebaane, pays tribute via an eclectic mix of splendid Scottish heritage, Harris Tweed fabric, Victorian steampunk in zinc, copper and brass and warm rich teak wood with Victorian period scientific curiosities decorating walls and shelves.

19TH CENTURY ARTEFACTS

To help create this atmospheric interior, Henry made extensive use of decorative tin tiles from Andy Thornton. One wall has been clad completely in their ornate Leaf design tile, onto which has been fixed industrial steampunk-style pipework and gauges. The tiles have been left in their natural bright tin finish and simply given a clear lacquered finish to prevent rusting.

One wall of the restaurant, also clad in the tiles, is the backdrop for shelves filled with authentic 19th century artefacts evoking adventurous tropical explorations, such as apothecary bottles, specimen jars and microscopes.

BAR COUNTER CLAD WITH TILES

Even the ground floor cocktail bar features tin tiles from Andy Thornton. The bar counter includes a number of tiles inset into the timber panelling and carefully illuminated around the perimeter with warm LED lights, to highlight the embossed detail.

Said Chebaane: “After reading dozens of scientific, artistic and literary works from the 19th century, I was able to design an experience relevant to today's youth, while also being inclusive to a more mature audience. The result is a mixture of Victorian fantasy and postmodernist design.